GRE

Suggested GRE Argument Essay Template

April 18th, 2006 by Administrator

April 18th, 2006 by Administrator
Paragraph 1:
– Demonstrate that the Argument is understood
– List weaknesses. Most fall into these two categories: Fails to validate assumptions, uses poorly defined terms.
– Mention what could be done to strenghthen the Argument.

Paragraph 2:
– Detail assumptions upon which the Argument hinges
– Describe what would be required to validate these assumptions
(consider expert testimony, empirical research, and real-life examples)
– List gaps between existing evidence and what is necessary

Paragraph 3:
– Discuss poorly defined terms. What could they mean? How would these different meanings affect the Argument?

Final Paragraph:
– Discuss what could strengthen the Argument
– Summarize the essay.

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AdministratorSuggested GRE Argument Essay Template

Suggested GRE Issue Essay Template

Suggested GRE Issue Essay Template

April 18th, 2006 by Administrator
Paragraph 1:
– Restate issue
– Agree or Disagree
– State two to four reasons for agreement or disagreement

Paragraph 2-4:
– Elaborate on reasons. Use empirical evidence, expert testimony, or anecdotes.

Paragraph 2nd to Last:
– Present an alternative viewpoint and refute it.

Final Paragraph:
– Conclusion

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AdministratorSuggested GRE Issue Essay Template

7 Must Know Deceptive Vocabulary GRE Words

7 Must Know Deceptive Vocabulary GRE Words

April 2nd, 2006 by Administrator

Words that dont look like their meaning are often thrown on the GRE to fool the test-taker. It is highly suggested that you know the following words:

Restive: on edge (for example you would think of “rest/resting” but instead its not, that is deceptive vocabulary)

Protean: variable

Noisome: foul smelling

Prolix: rambling & wordy

Tortuous: full of plot twists

Obviate: to make unnecessary

Ponderous: bogged down, tedious


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Administrator7 Must Know Deceptive Vocabulary GRE Words

6 Common Bridges to GRE Analogies

6 Common Bridges to GRE Analogies

March 1st, 2006 by Administrator
Building bridges is important in the GRE Verbal Analogy Section.

For example:

Some ORANGES are orange in color is weak
UMBRELLAs provide protection from RAIN is strong

The key is to create a strong bridge between the two words.

There are 6 types or bridges that account for almost all of the GRE analogies. Knowing these are important:

Characteristic: A GENIUS is by definition is SMART

Lack: Someone who’s TIRED lacks ENERGY

Degree: Something ENORMOUS is very LARGE

Type: STRAWBERRY is a type of FRUIT

Part/Whole: An ORCHESTRA is made up of several PLAYERs

Function: EARPLUGS are used to lessen NOISE

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Administrator6 Common Bridges to GRE Analogies

Kaplan GRE Prep Classroom Course Review

Kaplan GRE Prep Classroom Course Review

February 28th, 2006 by Administrator

I have attended two sessions now and have been very impressed at Kaplan’s standard of service and most importantly the preparation material. Before the class started, I recieved the study course book, flash cards, quick reference sheet, and GRE quick reference book. All of these are well rounded materials and more than enough to study from.

At the first class, we took a diagnostic test to create a baseline score that would be used for the higher score guarantee they offer. Hopefully, I will not need to use that guarantee. The test lasted two hours with four 30 min sections split between math and verbal. Scores were posted in our online page a couple days later.

During the second class, we met our instructor who was very nice (cute too!) and insisted we ask questions at anytime. The class was quite fast paced as we studied math techniques and tricks from the course book and solved a couple dozen problems along the way. The sessions alternate between math and verbal. Students are asked to read out loud and answer questions, so day dreaming is not an option. After the almost three hour session (yes, it runs a little overtime) my mind was quite fried, but eager to learn more.

Hopefully, eager enough to go through the hundreds of tutorials / practices via Kaptest’s online syllabus. Besides the homework done in the course book, the primary bulk is online. Supposedly, the online material is custom tailored based on your diagnostic score. Materials are marked “Recommended” or “Required” and take about 15-30 minutes each to complete.

I look forward to the next Kaplan session and so far think it has been a great investment. I’ll try and do an update later down the road.

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AdministratorKaplan GRE Prep Classroom Course Review

CAT Tips & Strategies

CAT Tips & Strategies

February 20th, 2006 by Administrator

A CAT differs from a traditional paper and pencil test both in how it works and how it determines your score. Plan your test-taking strategy with this in mind.

On the CAT…
the computer shows you only one question at a time and does not allow you to see the next question until you’ve responded to the one at hand. You can’t go back to change an answer once you’ve responded and gone onto the next question. So you should…

* Double-check your answers before moving on. If a question is taking a long time to complete, cut your losses. Eliminate answer choices you know are wrong, guess one of the remaining choices and move on. Don’t get bogged down.

On the CAT…
it is easier to change the computer’s estimate of your ability at the start of the test than at the end of the test. So you should…

* Spend more time on the early questions in order to make sure you get as many of them right as possible. On the first third of each section you should double check your work before moving on.

On the CAT…
there is a penalty for unanswered questions: any questions at the end of a section that you do not reach will hurt your score. So you should…

* Make sure you answer every question on the test. If you have any questions left as time runs out, guess the answer to these questions rather than leave them unanswered. Getting them wrong will hurt your score less than not answering them at all.

Information provided by Kaplan Test Prep – Kaptest.com

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AdministratorCAT Tips & Strategies

Computer Adapative Testing (CAT)

Computer Adapative Testing (CAT)

February 20th, 2006 by Administrator
How a Computer Adaptive Test Differs from a Paper-and-Pencil Test
Computer Adaptive Tests, or CATs, are quite different from the paper-and-pencil standardized tests you probably have seen in the past. Aside from being taken on computer at a special test center, the main difference between Cats and paper-and-pencil tests is that Cats “adapt” to your performance. Each test taker is given a different mix of questions depending on how well he or she is doing on the test. This means the questions get harder or easier depending on whether you answer them correctly or not. Your score is not only determined by how many questions you get right, but by the difficulty level of these questions.

How a Computer Adaptive Test Finds Your Score.
When you start a section, the computer:

* Assumes you are of average ability (about 500 on the GRE*).
* Gives you a medium difficulty-level question. About half the people who take the test would get this question right, and about half would get it wrong.

What happens next depends on whether you answer the question correctly or not:

* If you answer the question correctly, your score goes up and you are given a slightly harder question.
* If you answer a question incorrectly, your score goes down and you are given a slightly easier question.

This continues for the rest of the test. Every time you get the question right, the computer raises your score, then gives you a slightly harder question. Every time you get a question wrong, the computer lowers your score, then gives you a slightly easier question. In this way the computer tries to “home in” on your score. Theoretically, as you get to the end of a section, you will reach a point where every time the computer raises the difficulty level of a question, you will get it wrong, but every time it lowers the difficulty level of a question, you will get it right.

Information provided by Kaplan Test Prep – Kaptest.com

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AdministratorComputer Adapative Testing (CAT)